Friday , 28 April 2017
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Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games

© Mark Davidson

© Mark Davidson

The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games got off to a spectacular start with a star studded Opening Ceremony that celebrated Scottish talent and culture through music, dance and humour.

Highlights of the night included performances from Rod Stewart and Amy MacDonald, a beautiful rendition of Loch Lomond by violinist Nicola Benedetti, a moving piece from Scottish Ballet and the amazing volunteers who danced, sang and helped create an unforgettable atmosphere in Celtic Park.

Leading each nation into the arena was a Scottish Terrier adorned with a coat with that nations name on it – a very nice touch. 41 ‘Scottie’ dogs were used, so some did have to do a costume change to accommodate the 71 nations and territories.

Despite some initial problems opening the baton to retrieve the message placed in it 288 days prior by the Queen, before it made it’s journey across the world, it was handed to the Queen for her to officially declare the Games open, which was met with a resounding applause from the crowd.

All in all, it is fair to say that Glasgow made its mark on the world and succeeded in putting on a show to make Scotland proud.

 

Athletics

David Weir winning Gold in the T54 1500m © Mark Davidson

David Weir winning Gold in the T54 1500m © Mark Davidson

Hampden Park set the scene for the Athletics. The integrated sports schedule went down spectacularly with the crowd and the Para-Sports received equal coverage throughout the Games. It was great to hear the roar of the crowd for all the athletes of the home nations and it was clear to see why the Commonwealth Games has become known as the ‘Friendly Games’. That’s not to take away from the fierce competition that was taking place in the arena as the athletes gave us some incredible performances to remember.

Results:

Women’s Long Jump T37/38 Final

Gold – Jodi Elkington – Australia – 4.39m
Silver – Bethy Woodward – England – 4.00m
Bronze – Johana Benson – Namibia – 3.82m

(Olivia Breen and Beverley Jones from Wales came 4th and 6th respectively and Fiona Clarke from England came 8th)

Men’s Discus Throw F42/44 Final

Gold – Dan Greaves – England – 59.21m
Silver – Aled Davies – Wales – 46.83m
Bronze – Richard Okigbazi – Nigeria – 39.38m

Women’s 100m T12 Final

Gold – Libby Clegg – Scotland – 12.20
Silver – Maria Elisa Muchavo – Mozambique – 13.33
Bronze – Lahja Ishittle – Namibia – 13.48

(Tracey Hinton from Wales came 4th)

Men’s 100m T37 Final

Gold – Fanie van der Merwe – South Africa – 11.65
Silver – Charl du Toit – South Africa – 11.89
Bronze – Rhys Jones – Wales – 12.04

(Jason MacLean from Scotland came 5th and Daniel Hooker from England came 7th)

Women’s 1500m T54 Final

Gold – Angela Ballard – Australia – 3:59.20
Silver – Diane Roy – Canada – 3:59.55
Bronze – Jade Jones – England – 4:00.19

(Samantha Kinghorn from Scotland came 5th, Shelly Woods from Englandcame 6th, Meggan  Dawson-Farrell from Scotland came 7th and Lauren Rowles from England came 9th)

Men’s 1500m T54 Final

Gold – David Weir – England – 3:21.67
Silver – Kurt Fearnley – Australia – 3:23.08
Bronze – Alex Dupont – Canada – 3:23.62

(William Smith from England came 5th)

 

Swimming

Erraid Davies, the Scottish 13 year old who swam her way to a bronze medal © Peter Rimmer

Erraid Davies, the Scottish 13 year old who swam her way to a bronze medal © Peter Rimmer

Tollcross International Swimming Centre was home to some memorable races in the pool. However, the star of the show had to be our Scottish cover star, Erraid Davies. The 13 year old from Shetland stormed to a bronze medal in the 100m Breaststroke SB9 final. A look of shock was her first expression as the young swimmer was clearly astounded by her own success at her first ever Commonwealth Games. Needless to say the predominantly Scottish crowd went wild with raucous applause and support for this young star. We are sure we will be seeing a lot more of Erraid Davies in the not to distant future.

Results:

Men’s 200m Freestyle S14 Final

Gold – Daniel Fox – Australia – 1:57.89
Silver – Thomas Hamer – England – 2:00.27
Bronze – Jack Thomas – Wales – 2:01.27

(Craig Rodgie from Scotland came 5th)

Men’s 100m Freestyle S9 Final

Gold – Rowan Crothers – Australia – 54.58
Silver – Matthew Cowdrey – Australia – 56.33
Bronze – Brenden Hall – Australia – 56.85

Women’s 100m Freestyle S8 Final

Gold – Maddison Elliott – Australia – 1:05.32
Silver – Stephanie Slater – England – 1:05.73
Bronze – Lakeisha Patterson – Australia – 1:08.98

Women’s 100m Breaststroke SB9 Final

Gold – Sophie Pascoe – New Zealand – 1:19.36
Silver – Madeleine Scott – Australia – 1:21.38
Bronze – Erraid Davies – Scotland – 1:21.68

Men’s 200m Individual Medley SM8 Final

Gold – Oliver Hynd – England – 2:22.86
Silver – Jesse Aungles – Australia – 2:31.25
Bronze – Blake Cochrane – Australia – 2:32.72

Women’s 200m Individual Medley SM10 Final

Gold – Sophie Pascoe – New Zealand – 2:27.74
Silver – Katherine Downie – Australia – 2:31.98
Bronze – Aurelie Rivard – Canada – 2:32.09

 

Cycling

Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott secured 2 Gold medals for England © Peter Rimmer

Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott secured 2 Gold medals for England © Peter Rimmer

The home nations excelled at the Chris Hoy Velodrome with England and Scotland dominating on the track. The Velodrome is an incredible venue for watching the cycling, the heat is almost oppressive, the music is blaring throughout the races and the proximity to the track is unlike any other sport drawing you into the tactical battles going on around the steep track.

Results:

Women’s Sprint B2 Tandem Finals

Gold – Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott – England
Silver – Aileen McGlynn and Louise Haston- Scotland
Bronze – Brandie O’Connor  and Breanna Hargrave – Australia

(Laura Cluxton from Scotland came 5th and Rhiannon Henry from Wales came 6th)

Men’s 1000m Time Trial B2 Tandem

Gold – Neil Fachie and Craig Maclean – Scotland – 1:02.096
Silver – Kieran Modra and Jason Niblett – Australia – 1:02.244
Bronze – Matthew Ellis and Ieuan Williams – Wales – 1:04.095

(James Brown from Northern Ireland came 5th)

Men’s Sprint B2 Tandem Finals

Gold – Neil Fachie and Craig Maclean – Scotland
Silver – Kieran Modra and Jason Niblett – Australia
Bronze – Paul Kennedy and Thomas Clarke – Australia

(Matthew Ellis and Ieuan Williams from Wales came 4th)

Women’s 1000m Time Trial B2 Tandem

Gold – Sophie Thornhill and Helen Scott – England – 1:08.187
Silver – Aileen McGlynn and Louise Haston- Scotland – 1:09.771|
Bronze – Brandie O’Connor and Breanna Hargrave – Australia – 1:10.543

(Laura Cluxton from Scotland came 5th and Rhiannon Henry from Wales came 6th)

 

Lawn Bowls

© Peter Rimmer

© Peter Rimmer

A game of skill and accuracy, Lawn Bowls was set in one of the most picturesque areas of Glasgow. Kelvingrove Museum and the stunning Glasgow University building were the backdrop to this competition and luckily the sun shone for the majority of the games.

Lawn Bowls is one of the most accessible sports that disabled people can get involved in. A great example of this can be seen in the images below of Bob Love, an English competitor who uses only his feet to bowl.

Results:

Mixed Pairs B2/B3

Gold – South Africa
Silver – Scotland
Bronze – Australia

Open Triples B6/B7/B8

Gold – South Africa
Silver – New Zealand
Bronze – England

 

Powerlifting

Sakina Khatun of India © Mark Davidson

Sakina Khatun of India © Mark Davidson


Power, grit and determination. The Powerlifting highlighted the unbelievable strength and technique of these incredible athletes. The medals are decided from a formula that takes the athletes bodyweight and the weight they lift into consideration and the Clyde Auditorium showcased some of the best in the world with Nigeria dominating in all events.

Women’s Lightweight (up to 61kg)

Gold – Esther Oyema – Nigeria – 136.0
Silver – Natalie Blake – England – 100.2
Bronze – Sakina Khatun – India – 88.2

Women’s Heavyweight (from 61.1kg)

Gold – Loveline Obiji – Nigeria – 122.4
Silver – Bose Omolayo – Nigeria – 113.4
Bronze – Joyce Wambui Njuguna – Kenya – 68.6

Men’s Lightweight (up to 72kg)

Gold – Paul Kehinde – Nigeria – 221.0
Silver – Rolland Ezuruike – Nigeria – 220.2
Bronze – Ali Jawad – England – 209.4

Men’s Heavyweight (from 72.1kg)

Gold – Abdulazeez Ibrahim – Nigeria – 197.0
Silver – Rajinder Rahelu – India – 180.5
Bronze – Jong Yee Khie – Malaysia – 178.0 

Scotland’s Michael Yule came a close 4th place with 172.9 points.

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