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Vicky McDermott, chief executive of Papworth Trust

A new report setting out both the “concerns and opportunities” for disabled people in the aftermath of Brexit has been released by leading disability charity Papworth Trust.

The 64-page document, entitled ‘Brexit – What next for disabled people?’, aims to raise awareness of the various issues coming out of the UK’s decision to leave the European Union in June.

Social care, accessible housing, welfare and education are all debated with the charity calling on the Department for Exiting the European Union to work closely with voluntary sector representatives to consider the wider implications for disabled people.

Vicky McDermott, chief executive of Papworth Trust, said:

“The purpose of Papworth Trust’s latest EU report is to set out these various concerns and opportunities.

“We have written it with the intention of raising the profile of these issues and identifying the related questions that need to be addressed by Government during the transition period.

“We hope it will lead to a greater debate about the impact of Brexit on disabled people, so that we can all have a better understanding of exactly what comes next for us all.”

In May, Papworth Trust published a well-received pre-Brexit report, entitled ‘The EU Referendum: Disability and the European Union’, which set out to highlight how disabled people could be affected by the crucial vote.

The charity claim “little was said” by either rival campaign about the implications of the outcome for disabled voters when many EU initiatives have had a positive impact on their day-to-day lives.

Ms McDermott added: “During both the run-up to the referendum and in its immediate aftermath, almost nothing has been said about the possible impact of the vote on the 12 million people with a limiting long term illness, impairment or disability who live in the UK.

“Disabled people, have a number of concerns about the short and long-term impacts of the decision to leave the EU and about the policies of the government during the management of the transitional and post-exit periods.

“At the same time, the transformed political environment also creates new choices and opportunities that, if properly taken, could be directed to the advantage of disabled people throughout the UK.

“We have written the report with the intention of raising the profile of these issues and identifying the related questions that need to be addressed by Government during the transition period.

“We hope it will lead to a greater debate about the impact of Brexit on disabled people, so that we can all have a better understanding of exactly what comes next for us all.”

The charity is highlighting the issues of the report at all three main political party conferences.

The report can be viewed at http://online.flipbuilder.com/afjd/wpxb/.